Annual security report

Clery Act

A hard copy printout of this report may also be requested by contacting the WSU Vancouver Department of Public Safety by emailing wsuvcops@wsu.edu, or calling 360-546-9001.

Back to top

Preparation of the Annual Security Report

Washington State University Vancouver (WSU Vancouver) prepares this report in compliance with the Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Policy and Campus Crime Statistics Act (Clery Act), as well as the Violence Against Women Reauthorization Act of 2013 (VAWA) amendments to the Clery Act, using information obtained by the WSU Clery Compliance Committee comprised of representatives from various WSU offices including, but not limited to, the WSU Vancouver Police Department (WSU Vancouver PD), WSU Compliance and Civil Rights (CCR), the Center for Community Standards (CCS), Cougar Health Services (CHS), and the Office of Emergency Management.

Additionally, information is gathered from Campus Security Authorities, local law enforcement agencies (including the Clark County Sheriff’s Office), and information provided by other surrounding law enforcement agencies.

The report also includes statistics for the previous three calendar years concerning reported crimes that occurred on campus, and in certain off-campus buildings or property owned or controlled by WSU Vancouver. In accordance with the Clery Act, the statistics contained in this report are limited to specific crimes occurring within a designated geographic area.

The statistics in this report may vary from statistics maintained within other WSU offices authorized to receive reports of incidents implicating laws and WSU policies, such as the WSU Police Department, the Pullman Police Department, Compliance and Civil Rights (CCR), the Center for Community Standards, and/or Cougar Health Services.

The Clery Act promotes campus safety by providing information to students, parents, employees, and the WSU community about public safety, crime prevention, and response efforts by WSU Vancouver. It also promotes transparency about crimes that occur on campus and other threats to health and safety. To further those efforts, this report provides information on education, prevention, and awareness efforts by WSU Vancouver to empower the WSU Vancouver community to take a more active role in their personal safety and security.

Back to top

Campus Law Enforcement

The Washington State University Vancouver Police Department (WSU Vancouver PD) is the primary police agency for the Washington State University – Vancouver campus. Individuals may also contact external agencies, including the Vancouver Police Department, the Clark County Sheriff’s Office, Washington State Patrol, or other law enforcement agencies.

Reporting to Law Enforcement

For incidents that are currently occurring, recently occurred, or need immediate assistance, please dial 911. For incidents of a non-emergency nature, please dial Public Safety office at 360-546-9001. All 911 calls will be answered by CRESA, the local emergency dispatch center, which manages consolidated dispatch operations for police, fire, and EMS units for multiple counties, including Clark County. A dispatcher will collect your information and determine the appropriate police, fire, and/or medical aid required.

Commitment to Safety

WSU Vancouver-PD strives to educate the campus community and maintain a reasonably safe environment on campus. WSU Vancouver encourages accurate and prompt reporting of all crimes to the campus police, WSU Vancouver PD, and to the appropriate police agencies (including Clark County Sheriff’s Office and the Vancouver Police Department), when the victim of a crime elects to, or is unable to, make such a report.

WSU Vancouver-PD personnel provides educational and prevention driven programs to students. Although WSU Vancouver-PD takes many steps to educate and maintain safety on campus, each individual within the campus community plays a role and it is important to be aware of surroundings and use reasonable judgment when working or visiting on campus. Please report suspicious or criminal activities to law enforcement by calling 911.

Back to top

Enforcement Authority and Jurisdiction of Security Personnel

The WSU Vancouver-PD is empowered through Chapter 43.101 of the Revised Code of Washington, and has the authority to arrest. Each WSU Vancouver PD officer receives the same Washington State Police Academy training as city and county peace officers throughout Washington State in addition to training specific to the unique needs of a campus environment. The WSU Vancouver campus and various WSU-operated properties represents the primary jurisdiction of WSU Vancouver PD. WSU Vancouver PD handles the patrol, investigation, crime prevention education, and related law enforcement duties for the campus community. WSU Vancouver PD is assisted by the Clark County Sheriff’s Office when WSU Vancouver PD Officers are unavailable.

The WSU Vancouver Police Department is comprised of:

  • 3 Sworn Officers
  • 1 part-time Officer
  • 1 Campus Security Officer
  • 3 part-time Community Service Officers (security)

Back to top

Relationship Between Campus Security Personnel and State or Local Police Agencies

WSU Vancouver-PD maintains a collaborative and close relationship with the Clark County Sheriff’s Office, especially when addressing matters that impact the WSU Vancouver campus and community. Local collaboration includes inter-operative radio capability, a joint police records computer system (with the City and County), training programs, and at times, investigation of incidents. Additionally, WSU Vancouver-PD also collaborates with the Vancouver Police Department, the Washington State Patrol, and various state and federal law enforcement agencies.

Generally, WSU Vancouver-PD does not provide law enforcement services to off-campus residences or properties. WSU Vancouver relies on the close working relationship with Clark County Sheriff’s Office and Vancouver PD to receive information about incidents involving WSU Vancouver students and recognized student organizations.

All recognized WSU Vancouver student organizations must abide by federal, state, and local laws and WSU Vancouver policies. WSU Vancouver may become involved in off-campus conduct of students and recognized student organizations when such conduct is determined to affect a substantial university interest, as defined in the Standards of Conduct for Students Policy.

Back to top

Procedures for Pastoral and Professional Counselors

Campus “pastoral counselors” and campus “professional counselors,” when acting as such, are not considered to be a campus security authority, and are not required to report crimes for inclusion in the annual disclosure of crime statistics.

Professional Counselor definition

An employee of an institution whose official responsibilities include providing psychological counseling to members of the institution’s community and who is functioning within the scope of his or her license or certification.

Pastoral Counselor definition

An employee of an institution who is associated with a religious order or denomination recognized by that religious order or denomination as someone who provides confidential counseling and who is functioning within the scope of that recognition as a pastoral counselor

Back to top

Reporting Crimes or Emergencies

There are various ways for students, faculty, staff, and WSU Vancouver community members to report crimes, incidents, and other emergencies to law enforcement, appropriate WSU Vancouver officials, or confidentially to crime victim advocates, medical providers, or mental health providers. In addition, there are options for reporting anonymously for the purpose of inclusion in the annual crime statistics disclosure. This chapter will describe the various reporting options. Please note, reporting regarding dating violence, domestic violence, sexual assault, and stalking will be covered more thoroughly in the next chapter.

Back to top

Reporting Criminal Actions or Other Emergencies to Law Enforcement

Individuals can report in progress crimes and other emergencies by dialing 911 or crimes that are not in progress by dialing 360-546-9001. This allows the WSU Vancouver Police Department to take actions to address the concern and consider issuing a Timely Warning or Emergency Notification if there is an ongoing threat to the safety of the campus community or an immediate threat occurring on campus.

WSU Vancouver encourages accurate and prompt reporting of all crimes to campus public safety officials and the appropriate police agencies even when the victim of a crime elects not to, or is unable to, make such a report. Reports can be made to the WSU Vancouver Police Department, or one of the local or state police agencies, including the Clark County Sheriff’s Office and Vancouver Police Department.

For incidents that are currently occurring, recently occurred, or need immediate assistance, please dial 911. For incidents of a non-emergency nature, please dial 360-546-9001 or email wsuvcops@wsu.edu . All 911 calls will be answered by CRESA, the local emergency dispatch center, which manages consolidated dispatch operations for police, fire, and EMS units for multiple counties, including Clark County. A dispatcher will collect your information and determine the appropriate police, fire, and/or medical aid required.

Reporting a Property Crime

  1. Report your loss or damages to the police department as soon as possible – Report to law enforcement by calling 911.
  2. Don’t touch anything until police are able to examine the area.
  3. Be prepared to provide serial numbers or identifying marks or characteristics of the items taken.
  4. Be alert for more damage or items missing that may come to your attention.
  5. Itemize your valuables and write down serial numbers.
  6. Mark your items for identification with your driver’s license number.
  7. If you have unique or valuable items, photograph them and keep the pictures or video with your list of serial numbers.

Reporting an Assault (Physical and/or Sexual)

  1. Report the assault to police as soon as possible — dial 911. May also report to the university and/or seek confidential services through WSU Vancouver Wellness Center (Counseling and Psychological Services). They can be contacted at 360-546-9238, and are located on the 1st floor of the Classroom Building (VCLS).
  2. If you’ve been injured, seek medical attention. When you call to report, tell the communications center you’ve been hurt. They will assist you in getting aid.
  3. If you are reporting a sexual assault, refrain from showering, washing your hands, or washing your clothes. This will help preserve evidence that may be necessary to prove a criminal offense.
  4. Support and counseling resources are available. If you don’t know who to call or where to start, ask the police officer for help.

Back to top

Reporting to Campus Security Authorities

Individuals may report to a Campus Security Authority for the purpose of making timely warning report or for inclusion in the annual crime statistics disclosure. A Campus Security Authority (CSA) includes designated WSU officials and offices who are an “official of an institution who has significant responsibility for student and campus activities, including, but not limited to, student housing, student discipline, and campus judicial disciplinary proceedings.” The CSA’s report incidents for the purpose of inclusion in the statistics provided in this report to the WSU Police Department directly or by submitting the online CSA Reporting form which is then distributed to the appropriate office.

A pastoral or professional counselor within the institution is not considered a campus security authority when “acting as a pastoral or professional counselor,” and is not required to report crimes for inclusion into the annual disclosure of crime statistics.

Back to top

Campus Security Authority (CSA) List

Although there are many CSAs; WSU officially designates the following key departments and/or titles as locations where individuals should report crimes for the purpose of making timely warning reports and the annual statistical disclosure.

  • WSU Vancouver Police Department | VCLS (Classroom Building) Room 120 | Emergency – 911 | Non-Emergency – | 360-546-9001
  • Title IX Coordinator | VSS (Student Services Building) | Dr. domanic Thomas | domanic.thomas@wsu.edu | 360-546-9788
  • Office of Civil Rights Compliance and Investigation | (Located on Pullman Campus) French Administration 225, PO Box 641022 | 509-335-8288
  • Center for Community Standards | (Located on Pullman Campus) French Administration 130, PO Box 641040 | 509-335-4532
  • Office of the Dean of Students | (Located on Pullman Campus) French Administration 122, PO Box 641013 | 509-335-5757
  • Student Wellness Center Manager | VCLS (Classroom Building) | Dr. Patience McGinnis | 360-546-9238

Back to top

Voluntary, Confidential Reporting

WSU Vancouver provides a number of ways individuals can report crimes, serious incidents, and other emergencies. However, in the event that you or someone you know, decides not to report the incident to the university or law enforcement for investigation, you still have the option of filing a voluntary, confidential report.

Reporting anonymously allows WSU Vancouver to include the record of the report in the annual disclosure of crime statistics included in this report. Reporting anonymously also allows victims to gather information and learn about options available to them, before deciding on an appropriate option. Individuals may contact the relevant local agency (e.g. the WSU Vancouver Police Department at 360-546-9001, or the Clark County Sheriff’s Office by calling 911) to determine the level of anonymity available prior to reporting a crime. Please note that some limitations may exist depending upon the circumstances of the crime. Reports of sexual assault may be made anonymously to the WSU Vancouver Police Department. Additionally, individuals may report discrimination, sexual harassment, and sexual misconduct, as defined by the WSU Policy Prohibiting Discrimination, Discriminatory Harassment, Sexual Harassment, and Sex and Gender Based Violence, Executive Policy 15 (EP 15), anonymously to the WSU Office of Compliance and Civil Rights by emailing crci@wsu.edu, by calling 509-335-8288, or by submitting the online complaint form, for services and options, as well as inclusion in the annual disclosure of crime statistics.

Individuals can also seek confidential services from WSU Vancouver Wellness Center or WSU Cougar Health Services, and/or from state-wide advocacy groups, see the Washington Coalition of Sexual Assault Programs.

Back to top

Reporting to a University Department

Any member of the university community may submit a complaint that a student or recognized or registered student organization violated the standards of conduct.

  • Center for Community Standards | (Pullman Campus) French Administration 130, PO Box 641040 | 509-335-4532 | Online Reporting Form
  • Individuals may report crimes implicating the WSU Policy Prohibiting Discrimination, Discriminatory Harassment, Sexual Harassment, and Sex and Gender Based Violence, Executive Policy 15 (EP 15), to the Title IX Coordinator or the Office of Civil Rights Compliance and Investigation. More information on reporting:
  • Title IX Coordinator | VSS (Student Services Building) | Dr. domanic Thomas | domanic.thomas@wsu.edu | 360-546-9788
  • Office of Compliance and Civil Rights (CCR) | (Pullman Campus) French Administration 225, PO Box 641022 | 509-335-8288 | Online Reporting Form

In addition, consistent with WSU’s Policy Prohibiting Discrimination, Discriminatory Harassment, Sexual Harassment, and Sex and Gender Based Violence, Executive Policy 15 (EP 15), most WSU employees, with limited exceptions, are required to report an incident or situation involving sexual harassment or sexual misconduct to the Office of Compliance and Civil Rights (CCR) or to one of the designated Title IX Coordinators. Similarly, individuals with supervisory responsibilities are required to report incidents or situations involving discrimination to the Office of Compliance and Civil Rights. Additional information on reporting requirements, including information on those exempt from reporting under EP 15 are posted on the CCR Reporting Requirements page.

Back to top

General Tips for Staying Safe

Most crime is committed as a result of opportunity. The best prevention is to eliminate opportunities.

  1. Keep your residence doors locked at all times.
  2. Lock up electronics and other valuables.
  3. Report suspicious persons or activities.
  4. Report safety hazards, unsafe lighting, and defective equipment.
  5. Avoid walking alone at night. Let people know where you are going.
  6. Plan your walk by choosing a safe, well-lighted, and populated route.
  7. Be aware of your surroundings. Know where you are and where you are going. Know what to expect.
  8. Get to know your roommates and neighbors. Encourage checking on each other often.
  9. If consuming alcohol or other substances, do so safely. Pour your own drinks and use the buddy system when going out with friends.
  10. Learn non-violent intervention techniques to help your fellow VanCougs. Sign up for a bystander intervention training through Washington State University Vancouver Student Services and the Office of Student Involvement.

Back to top

Reporting Options and Responses to Dating Violence, Domestic Violence, Sexual Assault, and Stalking

There are several options in seeking care for an individual impacted by sexual violence, which includes sexual assault, sexual exploitation, dating violence, domestic violence and stalking. WSU provides access to both confidential and non-confidential resources. Victims/survivors are encouraged to access whichever resource they feel most comfortable with.

A current listing of resources for victims/survivors is maintained and posted by CCR. Victims/survivors can choose to seek medical care, even if they are unsure whether they want to make a police report or if they choose not to move forward with a criminal investigation. Victims/survivors can also seek support and referral information directly from the Office of Compliance and Civil Rights, or a local law enforcement agency.

A healthcare provider can help assess well-being and personal safety, provide any necessary medical treatment and refer students to counseling and other resources.

Healthcare providers at local hospitals offer Sexual Assault Forensic Exams to collect physical evidence for use in a law enforcement investigation and possible prosecution. Victims/survivors do not have to speak to the police in order to receive a forensic exam. Healthcare providers will explain the exam process before beginning and can answer any questions about what will happen during the exam. It is important to preserve any evidence that may be necessary to prove a criminal offense. Preservation includes refraining from showering or bathing and saving articles of clothing worn during the assault. Victims/survivors have the option to be accompanied by a support person, such as a friend or an advocate, during medical appointments and/or exams.

Reports of dating violence, domestic violence, sexual assault, and stalking may be made anonymously to the WSU Vancouver Police Department, the Clark County Sheriff’s Office, Vancouver Police Department or local police department. Additionally, individuals may report or file a formal complaint or dating violence, domestic violence, sexual assault, and stalking to WSU Compliance and Civil Rights by emailing ccr@wsu.edu, by calling 509-335-8288, or through CCR’s Sharing Concerns webpage.

Back to top

WSU Policy Prohibiting Dating Violence, Domestic Violence, Sexual Assault, and Stalking

WSU prohibits the crimes of dating violence, domestic violence, sexual assault, and stalking. These crimes are defined in WSU Policy in Executive Policy 15 and in the WSU Standards of Conduct for Students. WSU community members are also subject to Washington State laws prohibiting these crimes. The various definitions are listed in the below sections.

Back to top

Dating Violence, Domestic Violence, Sexual Assault, and Stalking Definitions

The following conduct is prohibited under the WSU Policy Prohibiting Discrimination, Discriminatory Harassment, Sexual Harassment, and Sex and Gender Based Violence, Executive Policy 15.

Sexual Harassment

Unwelcome conduct determined by a reasonable person to be so severe, pervasive, and objectively offensive that it effectively denies a person equal access to the school’s education program or activity

Quid Pro Quo Harassment

A school employee conditioning an educational benefit or service upon a person’s participation in unwelcome sexual conduct

Sexual Assault

An offense that meets the definition of rape, fondling, incest, or statutory rape as used in the FBI's UCR program:

  1. Rape: The penetration, no matter how slight, of the vagina or anus with any body part or object, or oral penetration by a sex organ of another person, without the consent of the victim.
  2. Fondling: The touching of the private body parts of another person for the purpose of sexual gratification, without the consent of the victim, including instances where the victim is incapable of giving consent because of their age or because of their temporary or permanent mental or physical incapacity.
  3. Incest: Sexual intercourse between persons who are related to each other within the degrees wherein marriage is prohibited by law.
  4. Statutory Rape: Sexual intercourse with a person who is under the statutory age of consent.

Dating Violence

Violence committed by a person who is or has been in a social relationship of a romantic or intimate nature with the victim.

  1. The existence of such a relationship shall be determined based on the reporting party's statement and with consideration of the length of the relationship, the type of relationship, and the frequency of interaction between the persons involved in the relationship.
  2. For the purposes of this definition -
    1. Dating violence includes, but is not limited to, sexual or physical abuse or the threat of such abuse.
    2. Dating violence does not include acts covered under the definition of domestic violence.
  3. For the purposes of complying with the requirements of this section and § 668.41, any incident meeting this definition is considered a crime for the purposes of Clery Act reporting.

Domestic Violence

  1. A felony or misdemeanor crime of violence committed -
    1. By a current or former spouse or intimate partner of the victim;
    2. By a person with whom the victim shares a child in common;
    3. By a person who is cohabitating with, or has cohabitated with, the victim as a spouse or intimate partner;
    4. By a person similarly situated to a spouse of the victim under the domestic or family violence laws of the jurisdiction in which the crime of violence occurred, or
    5. By any other person against an adult or youth victim who is protected from that person's acts under the domestic or family violence laws of the jurisdiction in which the crime of violence occurred.

Stalking

  1. Engaging in a course of conduct directed at a specific person that would cause a reasonable person to -
    1. Fear for the person's safety or the safety of others; or
    2. Suffer substantial emotional distress.
  2. For the purposes of this definition -
    1. Course of conduct means two or more acts, including, but not limited to, acts in which the stalker directly, indirectly, or through third parties, by any action, method, device, or means, follows, monitors, observes, surveils, threatens, or communicates to or about a person, or interferes with a person's property.
    2. Reasonable person means a reasonable person under similar circumstances and with similar identities to the victim.
    3. Substantial emotional distress means significant mental suffering or anguish that may, but does not necessarily, require medical or other professional treatment or counseling.

Retaliation

No recipient or other person may intimidate, threaten, coerce, or discriminate against any individual for the purpose of interfering with any right or privileged secured by Title IX or its implementing regulation, 34 CFR 106, or because the individual has made a report or complaint, testified, assisted, or participated or refused to participate in any manner in an investigation, proceeding, or hearing. Intimidation, threats, coercion, or discrimination, including charges against an individual for code of conduct violations that do not involve sex discrimination or sexual harassment but arise out of the same facts or circumstances as a report or complaint of sex discrimination, or a report or formal complaint of sexual harassment, for the purpose of interfering with any right or privileged secured by Title IX or its implementing regulation, 34 CFR 106, constitutes retaliation.

1st amendment activities do not constitute retaliation.

False Allegations

False allegations include making a materially false statement in bad faith during the course of a grievance proceeding.

Consent

Consent to any sexual activity must be clear, knowing, and voluntary. Anything less is equivalent to a "no." Clear, knowing, and voluntary consent to sexual activity requires that, at the time of the act, and throughout the sexual contact, all parties actively express words or conduct that a reasonable person would conclude demonstrates clear permission regarding willingness to engage in sexual activity and the conditions of such activity. Consent is active; silence or passivity is not consent. Even if words or conduct alone seem to imply consent, sexual activity is nonconsensual when:

  1. Force or coercion is threatened or used to procure compliance with the sexual activity.
    1. Force is the use of physical violence, physical force, threat, or intimidation to overcome resistance or gain consent to sexual activity.
    2. Coercion is unreasonable pressure for sexual activity. When an individual makes it clear through words or actions that the individual does not want to engage in sexual contact, wants to stop, or does not want to go past a certain point of sexual interaction, continued pressure beyond that point may be coercive. Other examples of coercion may include using blackmail or extortion to overcome resistance or gain consent to sexual activity.
  2. The person is asleep, unconscious, or physically unable to communicate his or her unwillingness to engage in sexual activity; or
  3. A reasonable person would or should know that the other person lacks the mental capacity at the time of the sexual activity to be able to understand the nature or consequences of the act, whether that incapacity is produced by illness, defect, the influence of alcohol or another substance, or some other cause. When alcohol or drugs are involved, a person is considered incapacitated or unable to give valid consent if the individual cannot fully understand the details of the sexual interaction (i.e., who, what, when, where, why, and how), and/or the individual lacks the capacity to reasonably understand the situation and to make rational, reasonable decisions.

Interference

Actions that intentionally:

  1. Dissuade or attempt to dissuade reporting parties, responding parties, or witnesses from reporting or participating in an investigation;
  2. Attempt to influence a reporting party, responding party, or witness to make an inaccurate statement in the investigation;
  3. Delay or disrupt, or attempt to delay or disrupt, any University processes related to this policy; and/or
  4. Alter or attempt to alter the evidence provided to or received by investigative or disciplinary processes.

Amnesty Policy

During a CRCI process, when a student voluntarily shares information about the possession or use of alcohol or drugs, CRCI does not refer the student to the Center for Community Standards for alcohol or drug related conduct proceedings, except where drugs or alcohol were used to gain advantage, incapacitation, or exploitation over another individual. The Center for Community Standards also uses discretion under WAC 504-26-510, the Good Samaritan Policy, and may refrain from imposing formal discipline for alcohol or drug use and possession under the Standards of Conduct for Students.

For more information, see:

Back to top

Washington State Definitions

The following definitions are provided under Washington State Law, RCW 9A.44.010.

Consent

At the time of the act of sexual intercourse or sexual contact there are actual words or conduct indicating freely given agreement to have sexual intercourse or sexual contact.

Mental Incapacity

A condition existing at the time of the offense which prevents a person from understanding the nature or consequences of the act of sexual intercourse whether that condition is produced by illness, defect, the influence of a substance or from some other cause.

Physically Helpless

A person who is unconscious or for any other reason is physically unable to communicate unwillingness to an act.

Forcible Compulsion

Is physical force which overcomes resistance, or a threat, express or implied, that places a person in fear of death or physical injury to herself or himself or another person, or in fear that she or he or another person will be kidnapped.

Sexual Intercourse

  • Has its ordinary meaning and occurs upon any penetration, however slight, and
  • Also means any penetration of the vagina or anus however slight, by an object, when committed on one person by another, whether such persons are of the same or opposite sex, except when such penetration is accomplished for medically recognized treatment or diagnostic purposes, and
  • Also means any act of sexual contact between persons involving the sex organs of one person and the mouth or anus of another whether such persons are of the same or opposite sex.

Sexual Contact

Any touching of the sexual or other intimate parts of a person done for the purpose of gratifying sexual desire of either party or a third party.

Domestic Violence (RCW 26.50.010)

  • Physical harm, bodily injury, assault, or the infliction of fear of imminent physical harm, bodily injury or assault, sexual assault, or stalking as defined in RCW 9A.46.110 of one intimate partner by another intimate partner; or
  • Physical harm, bodily injury, assault, or the infliction of fear of imminent physical harm, bodily injury or assault, sexual assault, or stalking as defined in RCW 9A.46.110 of one family or household member by another family or household member.

Family or Household Members (RCW 26.50.010)

  • Adult persons related by blood or marriage;
  • Adult persons who are presently residing together or who have resided together in the past; and
  • Persons who have a biological or legal parent-child relationship, including stepparents and stepchildren and grandparents and grandchildren.

Intimate Partner (RCW 26.50.010)

  • Spouses, or domestic partners;
  • Former spouses, or former domestic partners;
  • Persons who have a child in common regardless of whether they have been married or have lived together at any time;
  • Adult persons presently or previously residing together who have or have had a dating relationship;
  • Persons sixteen years of age or older who are presently residing together or who have resided together in the past and who have or have had a dating relationship; and
  • Persons sixteen years of age or older with whom a person sixteen years of age or older has or has had a dating relationship.

Dating Relationship

A social relationship of a romantic nature. Factors that the court may consider in making this determination include:

  • The length of time the relationship has existed;
  • The nature of the relationship; and
  • The frequency of interaction between the parties

Back to top

Definitions Contained In The Violence Against Women Act

Sexual Assault

The term ‘sexual assault’ means any nonconsensual sexual act proscribed by Federal, tribal, or State law, including when the victim lacks capacity to consent.

Domestic violence (34 U.S.C. 12291(a))

The term ‘‘domestic violence’’ includes felony or misdemeanor crimes of violence committed by a current or former spouse or intimate partner of the victim, by a person with whom the victim shares a child in common, by a person who is cohabitating with or has cohabitated with the victim as a spouse or intimate partner, by a person similarly situated to a spouse of the victim under the domestic or family violence laws of the jurisdiction receiving grant monies, or by any other person against an adult or youth victim who is protected from that person’s acts under the domestic or family violence laws of the jurisdiction

Dating violence (34 U.S.C. 12291(a))

The term ‘‘dating violence’’ means violence committed by a person

    1. who is or has been in a social relationship of a romantic or intimate nature with the victim; and
    2. where the existence of such a relationship shall be determined based on a consideration of the following factors:
      1. The length of the relationship.
      2. The type of relationship.
      3. The frequency of interact

Stalking (34 U.S.C. 12291(a))

The term ‘‘stalking’’ means engaging in a course of conduct directed at a specific person that would cause a reasonable person to—

  1. fear for his or her safety or the safety of others; or
  2. suffer substantial emotional distress.

Washington state law definitions of these crimes differ and are incorporated into the Revised Code of Washington.

Back to top

Preserving Evidence

When an incident of sexual violence occurs, it is important to preserve evidence to aid in a criminal prosecution, university response, and/or in obtaining a protection order. Evidence of physical harm, such as bruising or other visible injuries, should be documented by photographic evidence. Evidence of stalking including communication, such as text messages, voice mail, written notes, social media postings, or any other electronic communication should be saved and not altered in any way. In cases of sexual assault, avoid showering, using a toilet, or changing clothing prior to a medical examination. Any clothing removed should be placed in a bag.

Back to top

Protection Orders and No-Contact Orders

Victims/survivors have the right to seek legal protections such as orders of protection, no contact orders, restraining orders, or other lawful orders of criminal, civil, or tribal courts. WSU will comply with the lawful orders issued by such a court and will make modifications to educational and/or workplace environments to comply with the terms of such lawful orders. WSU may also implement a no contact order on any party as an interim measure, or as a sanction after a determination of responsibility, consistent with the WSU Code of Conduct for Students WAC-504-26-050, WSU BPPM 50.30 – Workplace Violence, and WA Governor’s Executive Order 96-05 – Domestic Violence in the workplace.

Back to top

Reporting Options

There are several reporting options available if a student, employee, or visitor of WSU Vancouver has experienced an incident of sexual violence, which includes sexual assault, sexual exploitation, dating violence, domestic violence, and stalking. In the case of an emergency or ongoing threat, get to a safe location if possible and report the incident by calling 911. If necessary, a victim/survivor should seek medical services as soon as possible for their physical well-being and the purpose of preserving evidence.

WSU Vancouver encourages victims and other individuals who are aware of sexual violence to report. WSU Vancouver also believes in providing survivors with autonomy in their reporting choices, as well as multiple reporting options of a confidential and non-confidential nature. Survivors can choose from one or more of the following options:

  • REPORT TO LAW ENFORCEMENT FOR THE PURPOSES OF:
    • Information Only
    • Partial Information
    • Complete Investigation
  • REPORT TO THE WSU OFFICE OF CIVIL RIGHTS COMPLIANCE AND INVESTIGATION FOR THE PURPOSES OF:
    • Documenting their concerns
    • Facilitating Resources
    • Requesting a consultation
    • Requesting an informal resolution, and/or
    • Requesting a University investigation
  • REPORT ANONYMOUSLY
  • SEEK CONFIDENTIAL SUPPORT THROUGH THE WELLNESS CENTER, A LOCAL ADVOCACY AGENCY, OR OTHER CONFIDENTIAL RESOURCES.

Even if a survivor does not want to report an experience, survivors are still encouraged to seek support from the Office of Civil Rights Compliance and Investigation, WSU Vancouver Police Department, the Office of the Dean of Students, and/or the Wellness Center. A report is not required to request services. WSU will also assist with facilitating a student or employee report to law enforcement, at the request of the student or employee.

The below sections describe in more detail the various reporting options.

Back to top

Reporting to Law Enforcement

Victims/survivors are encouraged to report to law enforcement. Even if they are not sure if they want to report for criminal investigation, they are encouraged to preserve evidence, which may include seeking a sexual assault forensic exam. Victims/survivors are also encouraged to seek care and support, including advocacy services, medical treatment and/or counseling services. Reporters are urged to preserve any evidence and to also seek medical and counseling services. Law enforcement can assist with filing criminal charges or pursuing a no contact order. To make a report of sexual violence to law enforcement, call 911 for immediate assistance or contact the WSU Vancouver Police Department (WSU Vancouver PD) at 360-546-9001 or wsuvcops@wsu.edu. The following guidelines may be considered when reporting to law enforcement:

  1. Report the assault to police as soon as possible — dial 911. Students may also report to the university and/or seek confidential services through WSU Vancouver Wellness Center. They can be contacted at 360-546-9238, and are located on the 1st floor of the Classroom Building (VCLS).
  2. If you’ve been injured, seek medical attention. When you call to report, tell the communications center you’ve been hurt. They will assist you in getting aid.
  3. If you are reporting a sexual assault, refrain from showering, washing your hands, or washing your clothes. This will help preserve evidence that may be necessary to prove a criminal offense.
  4. Support and counseling resources are available. The Directory of Services lists contact information If you don’t know who to call or where to start, ask the police officer for help.

Back to top

Reporting to WSU

Incidents of sexual violence, which includes sexual assault, sexual exploitation, intimate partner violence, and stalking, can be reported to WSU Compliance and Civil Rights (CCR), which works closely with Human Resource Services (HRS) for incidents involving employees and the Center for Community Standards (CCS) for incidents involving students. When CCR receives a report of misconduct, CCR will provide the student or employee with written information about their rights, supportive measures, and reporting options (including how to file a Formal Complaint with WSU), as well as information about CCR’s Procedural Guidelines and the WSU Policy Prohibiting Discrimination and Harassment. Outreach will also include written information about available counseling, health, mental health, victim advocacy, legal services, and other services available on campus and in the community. Additional resources will be identified depending on the student’s or employee’s particular needs (e.g. an international student may need support from International Programs regarding visa or immigration assistance); a complainant’s preferences with regards to supportive measures will be considered. Per CCR’s Procedural Guidelines and the WSU Policy Prohibiting Discrimination and Harassment, supportive measures, including academic support services and safety measures such as changes to work/academic schedules, residence hall assignments, or other protective measures, are available, regardless of whether the student or employee chooses to report the crime to campus police or local law enforcement. CCR, the Office of the Dean of Students, Student Affairs, Human Resource Services, campus police, and/or other administrators will help facilitate supportive measures requests.

CCR can document the victim/survivor’s concerns, assist the victim/survivor with campus safety options, connect the victim/survivor to local support, medical, and counseling resources, and if the victim/survivor (or the Title IX Coordinator) wishes to file a formal complaint, CCR can start an informal resolution or an investigation.

Back to top

Informal Resolutions

After receiving a formal complaint, CCR may engage in an informal resolution process. An informal resolution process is not commenced until written notice is provided to both parties disclosing the allegations and the requirements of the informal resolution process, as described in the CCR Procedural Guidelines, and until WSU has received voluntary, written consent to proceed with the informal resolution process from both parties.

WSU does not offer an informal resolution to resolve allegations that an employee sexually harassed a student, as defined by the EP15.B Title IX Sexual Harassment section, but may offer it for other circumstances.

Informal resolutions may include, but are not limited to:

  1. Conduct management plans or resolution agreements;
  2. Verbal or written counseling;
  3. Departmental resolutions;
  4. Alternative dispute resolutions;
  5. Mediation, if available; and/or
  6. Additional required training.

Investigations

CCR may conduct an investigation after receiving a formal complaint, which meets the requirements of EP15. CCR conducts a neutral and unbiased investigation, with investigators who do not have a conflict of interest or bias towards either party specifically or generally. CCR investigations are conducted pursuant to the Procedural Guidelines and are initiated with a presumption that the respondent is not responsible for the alleged conduct. CCR provides notice of the allegations in writing to both parties. Both parties have the right to present witnesses and evidence. The evidentiary burden is on WSU, not the parties.

During an investigation, WSU does not restrict the ability of either party to discuss the allegations under investigation or to gather and present relevant evidence. Throughout the investigative process, the parties have the right to have an advisor of their choice with them. The parties also have an opportunity to review the evidence collected and provide a written response, prior to the publication of an investigative report.

For more information about the investigative process, see the Procedural Guidelines.

CCR shares information about cases only on a need-to-know basis but cannot guarantee confidentiality. Although CCR does not share reporting information with law enforcement unless required to do so, CCR investigators notify victims/survivors of their option to report to on-campus or local police, to have campus authorities assist them in notifying law enforcement of a sexual violence incident, and decline to notify such authorities.

A report of sexual violence can be made to CCR or the Title IX Coordinator by telephone at 509-335-8288, by email at ccr@wsu.edu , by visiting the CCR office located in Room 225 of the French Administration Building on the Pullman campus or by using the online reporting form.

Confidential Counseling Protected by Law

Anyone who has experienced sexual violence may choose to consult with a licensed mental health care provider or health care provider of their choice. By law, such professionals are able to assist victims confidentially and are exempt from legal obligations to report incidents to the university, with some limited exceptions, such as child abuse, elder abuse, or certain threats of harm.

A victim/survivor may decide to disclose the incident to a confidential resource, local law enforcement, and/or may report to WSU Compliance and Civil Rights (CCR) for an investigative response by WSU, or to local law enforcement. A victim/survivor may decline to notify authorities, including CCR and/or law enforcement. CCR can also assist the victim/survivor in notifying law enforcement, if a victim/survivor elects to do so. CCR will not share information regarding reports made to the university with law enforcement, unless required to do so by law or requested to do so by the victim/survivor.

WSU policy prohibits retaliation against anyone who reports or participates in an investigative or disciplinary process by WSU. Please note, WSU employees and student employees may have reporting requirements and be required to provide information to CCR.

IN MOST INSTANCES, SERVICE PROVIDERS FROM THE FOLLOWING RESOURCES ARE AVAILABLE TO SPEAK CONFIDENTIALLY:

Campus Confidential Resources

  • WSU Vancouver Counseling Center | Counseling & Psychological Services and referrals-for students | 360-546-9238
  • WSU Vancouver Health Services| Medical Services and referrals-for students | 360-546-9238
  • WSU Employee Assistance Program (for employees) | 1-877-313-4455

Off-Campus Confidential Resources

WSU Amnesty Statement

WSU encourages students to report incidents of sexual violence without fear of consequences for having possessed or consumed alcohol and/or drugs at the time of the incident. WSU’s primary concern is to ensure the safety of the students involved and gather relevant information, so the University can address the student(s)’ concerns. Generally, WSU will refrain from imposing formal discipline for alcohol or drug use and/or possession under the Standards of Conduct for Students for victims and potential witnesses involved in situations of sexual violence in order to facilitate reporting and resolution of sexual violence concerns.

This practice will not provide relief from disciplinary action for other alleged violations of the Standards of Conduct (e.g., hazing, theft, drug/alcohol manufacturing or distribution).

Moreover, students who distribute alcohol and/or drugs that intentionally, or through negligence, contribute to the sexual violence will not be granted the same consideration.

In rare circumstances where the Center for Community Standards has concerns that a student’s repeated or severe misuse of alcohol or drugs will result in additional harm if unaddressed, the University may assign care-driven educational sanctions to address those concerns.

Back to top

Confidentiality in University Investigative Processes

WSU takes confidentiality seriously. During an investigation through WSU Compliance and Civil Rights (CCR), information is shared with others only on a need-to-know basis, which may include investigators, witnesses, the responding party, relevant WSU officials, or as required or permitted by law. Additionally, the investigation file may be subject to requests for public records. WSU redacts identifying or other information when legally permissible. The WSU Vancouver PD will not release the names of victims/survivors in its Timely Warning notices, Campus Alerts, Emergency Notifications, or in the Daily Crime Log.

When a victim/survivor requests confidentiality or requests WSU not proceed with an investigation, WSU respects that request to the extent possible. WSU’s legal obligation to provide a safe and nondiscriminatory environment may require that CCR proceed with an investigation, which may require investigators to share limited identifying information about a victim/survivor; however, CCR takes steps to inform a victim/survivor should it become necessary to share information. In all cases, CCR works with the victim/survivor to provide resources and support, including individualized and appropriate interim or safety measures. WSU may also maintain confidentiality for supportive measures, safety measures, or accommodations, or safety measures, to the extent allowable by law and where maintaining such confidentiality would not impair the ability of the institution to provide those services. WSU policy prohibits retaliation against anyone who reports or participates in an investigative or disciplinary process by WSU.

A victim/survivor may decline to notify authorities, including CCR and/or law enforcement. Should the victim/survivor report the incident to CCR, the university will not share the victim/survivor’s information with law enforcement, unless the victim/survivor requests that it be provided to law enforcement, or unless required to do so by law. CCR provides crime statistic information for purposes of the Annual Security Report to WSU Police Department but protects privacy to the extent possible.

Upon written request, WSU may disclose to the alleged victim/survivor of a crime of violence (as that term is defined in Section 16 of Title 18, United States Code), or a non-forcible sex offense, the results of any disciplinary proceeding conducted against a student who is the alleged perpetrator of such crime or offense. If the alleged victim is deceased as a result of such crime or offense, the next of kin of such victim shall treated as the alleged victim/survivor for purposes of this paragraph.

Back to top

Campus Investigative Procedures

Upon receiving a report of intimate partner violence, dating violence, domestic violence, sexual assault, sexual exploitation, or stalking, WSU Compliance and Civil Rights (CCR) typically takes steps to contact the individual who experienced the alleged conduct to provide information regarding resources available at WSU and in the community, including, but not limited to, available counseling, health, mental health, victim advocacy, legal assistance, student academic/living support, and employee assistance. CCR also provides information regarding the WSU Policy Prohibiting Discrimination and Harassment, Executive Policy #15, CCR Procedural Guidelines, supportive measures and resources, and the process to file a formal complaint for the purpose of requesting an informal resolution or an investigation. CCR also considers supportive measures for all participants involved in a CCR process to protect their safety, prevent further harm, or ensure continued access to educational programs or activities, including, but not limited to, altering the academic, WSU housing, and/or WSU employment arrangements of the parties, imposing no-contact directives, or imposing a trespass or interim suspension. Supportive measures are available regardless of whether or not the victim/survivor chooses to report the crime to campus police or local law enforcement; individualized and appropriate supportive measures are available to all parties in a matter. When taking such steps, WSU seeks to minimize unnecessary or unreasonable burdens on either party. CCR provides information regarding CCR processes, informal resolutions, investigations, and supportive measures to individuals in writing, and provides opportunities for all parties to ask questions about these processes and resources.

Informal Resolution Process

When filing a formal complaint, a complainant may request an informal resolution process. CCR will determine if the matter is appropriate for an informal resolution. Informal resolution processes are not available for allegations of an employee engaging in Title IX sexual harassment of a student as defined in Executive Policy #15. After providing notice of an informal resolution, CCR may proceed with an informal resolution, if appropriate, only after receiving voluntary written consent from both parties. An informal resolution may differ depending on the alleged conduct. Options for informal resolutions are listed in Executive Policy #15. Parties may have an advisor, including an attorney, participate during an informal resolution, but it is not required. CCR may work with the Division of Student Affairs, HRS, the Office of the Provost, or the individual department affected in resolving a matter under the informal resolution process. Informal resolutions may include provisions designed to punish the respondent. Prior to an agreed resolution, either party may withdraw from the informal resolution process at which point CCR will resume an investigation, unless the formal complaint is withdrawn or dismissed for some other reason. Upon entering into an informal resolution agreement, the agreement is binding on the parties and neither party may resume the grievance process. Agreement provisions will be considered with respect to the campus safety, including expulsion, suspension, or termination. CCR will document and maintain records of all informal resolutions.

Investigation Process

CCR investigates matters involving students, employees, and visitors regardless of whether the conduct occurred on or off campus, as appropriate; investigations follow CCR’s Procedural Guidelines. CCR provides a prompt, fair, and impartial investigation by officials who receive annual training on discriminatory conduct, including sexual violence, and how to conduct a trauma informed investigation and protect the safety of investigation participants. Where a CCR investigator has a conflict of interest or bias towards an investigation participant, the investigator will be screened from a case, and another investigator will review the matter. Investigations are conducted into allegations implicating Executive Policy #15; violations may be found where a preponderance of the evidence supports that conclusion. Upon initiation of an investigation, a CCR investigator will provide written notice to both parties, and the complainant and the respondent will have opportunities to provide information, responses, evidence, and witnesses. The complainant and the respondent have the right to be accompanied by the advisor of their choice. CCR makes every effort to gather all available relevant evidence and to neutrally and fairly assess the evidence to determine whether or not a violation of university policy exists. Per CCR’s Procedural Guidelines, CCR investigations are typically 60 days, with 30 additional days to review evidence and draft an investigative report; extensions are allowed for good cause, with written notice to the parties. After CCR has collected evidence, both parties will be provided with an opportunity to review the evidence and provide an additional written statement for consideration, prior to publication of a written report. When the investigation is complete, CCR will provide a written report to both the complainant and the respondent for review. For matters involving Title IX Sexual Harassment, the written report will include a summary of the investigation; for matters not involving Title IX Sexual Harassment, the written report will include a summary of the investigation and findings of fact under Executive Policy 15. The report will also be provided to the appropriate sanctioning office, which is the Center for Community Standards for students or the relevant supervisor or employee disciplinary committee for employees. For student matters, the Center for Community Standards will provide information to relevant parties regarding the WSU disciplinary processes, including, but not limited to information about conduct officer hearings, conduct board hearings, student rights, and campus and community resources. Where the Center for Community Standards does not initiate the community standards process, the students also have a right to appeal that decision. For employee matters, information about the right to appeal to the President’s CCR Appeals Committee is provided to both the complainant and the respondent. Additional rights and responsibilities for the employee sanctioning process can be found in the WSU Faculty Manual, the Administrative Professional Handbook, WAC 357-40 (civil service employees), applicable collective bargaining agreements, or the WSU Standards of Conduct for Students (WAC 504-26). Unless resolved through an Informal Resolution, matters involving Title IX Sexual Harassment, as defined in Executive Policy 15, receive a live hearing for a final determination. The live hearing decision maker will consider relevant evidence, and will only consider witness statements where the witness is subject to cross-examination by an advisor.

Back to top

Standard of Evidence

WSU determines the facts and whether there is a violation of this policy based on a preponderance of evidence. Preponderance means that the totality of the evidence persuades the fact finder that a fact is more probably true than not true and/or that it is more probable than not that a violation of the policy occurred.

Back to top

Additional Rights and Process During an Investigation

During an investigation, both students and employees, recognized as Complainants and Respondents are provided the following set of rights:

  • Individualized and appropriate supportive or safety measures, determined to be appropriate by CCR, Human Resource Services, the Office of the Dean of Students/Student Affairs, law enforcement, court order (including protection orders), and/or other University administrators
  • Confidential and non-confidential resources
  • Neutral investigative procedures and a prompt, fair, and impartial process
  • Receive information about University policies and procedures, including information that retaliation is prohibited for all investigation participants
  • Notification of allegations
  • Opportunity to respond to allegations and/or witness statements
  • Opportunity to present evidence
  • Opportunity to provide relevant witnesses
  • Opportunity to present and have considered their preferred resolution path
  • Opportunity to have a support person or advisor of their own choosing or retaining legal representation (at personal expenses)
  • Opportunity to be informed of the status and the outcome of an investigation
  • Opportunity to review investigation materials, including interview notes and documentary evidence
  • Opportunity to provide an additional written statement, after reviewing evidence, to be considered by an investigator prior to publication of a final report
  • Opportunity to review investigative findings and conclusions in writing, which may be redacted as necessary to protect privacy
  • Proof by Preponderance of the Evidence (more likely than not)
  • Simultaneous notification of outcomes and of hearing schedule
  • Rights to attend hearing(s)
  • Right to have out of hearing witness statements subjected to cross-examination by an advisor prior to consideration by the decision-maker, in matters involving Title IX Sexual Harassment, as defined by Executive Policy 15
  • Appeal rights

Back to top

Protective/Supportive Measures

WSU can take individualized and appropriate supportive steps to support and protect the students involved in the matter. Some support measures may be available regardless of whether a victim/survivor wishes to pursue a complaint or notify law enforcement. Supportive measures are non-disciplinary, non-punitive individualized services offered as appropriate and as reasonably available, without fee or charge to a reporting party/complaints or respondent. Supportive measures may be offered before and/or after a formal complaint is filed, or where no formal complaint is filed. WSU provides written notice of these and other available assistance options (such as how to request changes to academic, living, transportation and working situations, and protective measures) to victims/survivors, and, as applicable, to respondents. WSU may deliver a “no-contact” directive that informs parties to refrain from having contact with one another either directly or through third parties. Other supportive measures include but are not limited to, altering academic schedules, WSU dining arrangements, WSU housing, and/or WSU employment arrangements of the parties. When taking such steps, WSU seeks to minimize unnecessary or unreasonable burdens on either party. Violations of such protective measures may lead to disciplinary action. The Office of the Dean of Students is available to assist in implementing assistance measures to support victims/survivors.

The following list includes supportive measures that may be available to students or employees. Additional supportive measures may be available, as appropriate.

  1. Academic
    • Request consideration or flexibility to a faculty member regarding assignments, classroom attendance, deadlines, or other academic needs
    • Contacting individual faculty members for specific requests
    • Independent study
    • Additional tutoring
    • Withdrawal, withdrawal without penalty, medical withdrawal
    • Incompletes on classes
    • Transfer assistance
    • Classroom management plans
    • Remote attendance/recording classes
    • Academic schedule changes
    • Access Center/reasonable accommodations
    • Enrollment in Global Campus
  2. Referrals to Care Providers
    • Request consideration or flexibility to a faculty member regarding assignments, classroom attendance, deadlines, or other academic needs
    • Contacting individual faculty members for specific requests
    • Independent study
    • Additional tutoring
    • Withdrawal, withdrawal without penalty, medical withdrawal
    • Incompletes on classes
    • Transfer assistance
    • Classroom management plans
    • Remote attendance/recording classes
    • Academic schedule changes
    • Access Center/reasonable accommodations
    • Enrollment in Global Campus
  3. Services for Employees
    • Employee Assistance Program (counseling, financial, legal)
    • Workplace management/safety plans
    • Work schedule adjustments, as needed, to obtain medical or mental health care, legal assistance, and/or confidential secure shelter.
    • Domestic violence, sexual assault, stalking leave (RCW 49.76.010)
    • Change reporting lines in consultation with HRS.
    • Identify alternate work in consultation with supervisors/HRS.
    • Work from home options in consultation with supervisors/HRS.
    • Work schedule changes in consultation with supervisors/HRS.
    • Work accommodations/reasonable accommodations through HRS Disability Services.
  4. Safety
    • Employee Assistance Program (counseling, financial, legal)
    • Workplace management/safety plans
    • Work schedule adjustments, as needed, to obtain medical or mental health care, legal assistance, and/or confidential secure shelter.
    • Domestic violence, sexual assault, stalking leave (RCW 49.76.010)
    • Change reporting lines in consultation with HRS.
    • Identify alternate work in consultation with supervisors/HRS.
    • Work from home options in consultation with supervisors/HRS.
    • Work schedule changes in consultation with supervisors/HRS.
    • Work accommodations/reasonable accommodations through HRS Disability Services.
  5. Miscellaneous
    • Employee Assistance Program (counseling, financial, legal)
    • Workplace management/safety plans
    • Work schedule adjustments, as needed, to obtain medical or mental health care, legal assistance, and/or confidential secure shelter.
    • Domestic violence, sexual assault, stalking leave (RCW 49.76.010)
    • Change reporting lines in consultation with HRS.
    • Identify alternate work in consultation with supervisors/HRS.
    • Work from home options in consultation with supervisors/HRS.
    • Work schedule changes in consultation with supervisors/HRS.
    • Work accommodations/reasonable accommodations through HRS Disability Services.
  6. Legal resources and referrals

Back to top

Campus Sanctioning/Disciplinary Procedures-Students

The Center for Community Standards is committed contributing to a community which encourages and educates everyone to make positive choices and share messages of our values. The community standards process is designed to support students, uphold their rights and responsibilities, and hold them accountable for behaviors that conflict with our community standards. Every situation is different, so please contact the Center for Community Standards at 509-335-4532 or online.

After WSU Compliance and Civil Rights (CCR) determines whether the WSU Policy Prohibiting Discrimination and Harassment, Executive Policy #15 (EP 15), is implicated, the Center for Community Standards (CCS) will determine whether or not provisions of the WSU Standards of Conduct for Students (Standards of Conduct) are implicated. The complainant may determine the extent to which they will participate in this process. In limited circumstances, the Title IX Coordinator/CCR Director may determine that it is necessary to proceed with an investigation even where the complainant does not wish to participate, particularly where there is an ongoing safety threat to the campus or local community. In cases where CCR proceeds with an investigation without participation by the complainant, CCR will notify the complainant in advance of issuing notice, and will take great care to address the complainant’s concerns, if any.

During an investigation, CCR will interview witnesses and gather any documentary or other evidence, as provided by the individuals involved in the matter. At the conclusion of the investigation, CCR will send an investigative report to CCS and relevant parties. In Title IX Sexual Harassment matters, the investigative report will include a summary of the investigation, but will not constitute the final decision of the university and will not include a final determination regarding responsibility pursuant to federal regulations. For all other matters, the closing document may include findings, conclusions, credibility assessments, which may be relied upon by supervisors or decision makers. In matters involving student conduct, the Center for Community Standards will determine whether disciplinary action under the Standards of Conduct is warranted. If so, the matter may be referred to a one-to-one conduct officer hearing or a University Conduct Board. Both options provide a prompt, fair, and impartial review, pursuant to the guidelines in WAC 504-26, which also establish reasonable timelines for the process, which may be extended for good cause with written notice to the parties. University Conduct Board and University Appeals Board members and conduct officers receive annual training on issues related to dating violence, domestic violence, sexual assault, and stalking, as well as how to provide a hearing process that protects the safety of the parties and promotes accountability. University Conduct Board members, University Appeals Board members, and conduct officers also receive annual training about:

  • Cultural competency and implicit bias
  • Student development and student conduct philosophies, including the educational component of the student conduct process
  • Identifying bias against individuals and against groups;
  • Conflict of interest
  • Alcohol and drug prevention
  • Due process and burden of proof in student conduct matters
  • Sanctioning principles and guidelines.

Conduct officers also receive annual training on alternative dispute resolution and restorative justice.

Students in the process have the right to request recusal of a hearing officer and/or board member for demonstrated good cause, including conflict of interest or bias against either party.

In matters that could result in suspension of greater than ten instructional days, revocation of degree, expulsion, or loss of recognition (for student organizations) where disciplinary action is appropriate, and for matters involving Title IX Sexual Harassment, the matter will be referred to a full adjudicatory hearing before the University Conduct Board. The University Conduct Board is presided over by an Administrative Law Judge employed with the Office of Administrative Hearings. All relevant parties are notified of their rights during the hearing, the issues to be determine during the hearing, and any relevant dates, times, and locations; relevant parties also receive timely and equal access to any information that will be used during the disciplinary or sanctioning process. Finally, all relevant parties have the right to be accompanied by an advisor of their choice. For matters involving Title IX Sexual Harassment, the University Conduct Board will consider relevant evidence, and witness statements made outside of the hearing will not be considered unless the witness is subjected to cross-examination by an advisor. When the University Conduct Board concludes their review, relevant parties will be informed of the university’s decision at the same time and their right to appeal to the University Appeals Board. The decision becomes final either at the end of the appeals period (21 days) or when the University Appeals Board issues their decision. For more information about the University Conduct Board process, please visit WAC 504-26-403.

In some circumstances, the Center for Community Standards may address the matter through a less formal one-to-one conduct officer hearing. The Conduct Officer will make a decision regarding the responding student’s responsibility within ten calendar days of the hearing and will notify all relevant parties of the decision at the same time and inform them about their right to appeal to the University Appeals Board. The decision becomes final either at the end of the appeals period (21 days) or when the University Appeals Board issues their decision. Conduct Officers may issue educational sanctions including those listed in WAC 504-26-425, but not suspension of greater than ten instructional days, expulsion, revocation of degree, or loss of recognition (for student organizations).

Appeals rights are available to students for both matters reviewed by the University Conduct Board or the less formal one-to-one conduct officer hearings. Appeals are reviewed by the University Appeals Board.

In matters where CCR does not find a violation of EP 15, and the Complainant(s) or Respondent(s) object to the findings or outcome reflected in the CCR report, feel there is additional information that should be considered, or feel that student conduct charges are otherwise warranted in the matter, they have the opportunity to provide that information in writing to the Center for Community Standards within ten calendar days of the notification from the Center for Community Standards (please note, this does not apply to matters involving Title IX Sexual Harassment; such matters are always afforded a live hearing, unless resolved through an Informal Resolution process). The Center for Community Standards will consider this information in determining whether to proceed with a conduct process. If the Complainant(s) or Respondent(s) presents information to the Center for Community Standards that is not reflected in the CCR report, the Center for Community Standards may elect to refer the matter back to the CCR to review for a potential revision to CCR report prior to proceeding with the conduct process.

Back to top

Campus Sanctioning/Disciplinary Procedures-Employees

WSU Compliance and Civil Rights (CCR) will determine whether the Policy Prohibiting Discrimination and Harassment, Executive Policy #15 (EP 15) is implicated. Human Resource Services (HRS) will determine whether any other university policies may be implicated. Internal Audit may also be consulted in some matters. In some situations, WSU may be required to proceed with an investigation regardless of whether the reporting party decides to participate in the investigation or disciplinary process. During an investigation, CCR will interview witnesses and gather any documentary or other evidence, as provided by the individuals involved in the matter. During the investigation, the parties have the right to be accompanied by an advisor of their choice. The parties also have an opportunity to review evidence and submit an additional written statement to be considered by the investigator prior to publication of a final report.

At the conclusion of the investigation, CCR will send a report to HRS, relevant supervisors, and relevant parties. In Title IX Sexual Harassment matters the investigative report will include a summary of the investigation, but will not constitute the final decision of the university and will not include a final determination regarding responsibility. For all other matters, the closing document may include findings, conclusions, credibility assessments, which may be relied upon by supervisors or decision makers.

After CCR issues a final report, the Complainant(s) or Respondent(s) may file for an appeal of the investigation, in writing, with the WSU Office of the President within fifteen (15) calendar days of the date of issuance. The WSU President has a standing CCR Appeals Committee (the Committee), which consists of a committee chair, two regular committee members, and two alternate committee members. Committee members receive appropriate training, as determined by CCR, prior to serving on the committee and at least annually thereafter that is related to the nature of cases that they may review, including discrimination and sexual violence. Committee members are also screened for conflict of interest or bias against the reporting or responding parties.

During the fair and neutral review of an appeal, the chair of the Committee will conduct an initial review of the appeal, determine whether it met the minimum requirements of the appeals process, and if so, the chair will convene the Committee and send notice to the Complainant(s), Respondent(s), and CCR within seven (7) calendar days of receiving the appeal. After reviewing the appeal, the Committee will issue a decision letter to both parties within thirty (30) calendar days, unless good cause for an extension of up to thirty (30) days is necessary. The Committee’s decision is final with respect to the CCR investigation, unless the Committee determines that additional investigation by CCR is warranted. If the Committee concludes that additional investigation is warranted, at the conclusion of such additional investigation, no further appeal is available.

After the CCR investigative process and appeals process is completed, employee violations are reviewed by the appropriate supervisor, with the support of Human Resource Services. Supervisors will impose sanctions following the procedures set forth in applicable university policies and handbooks (e.g., the WSU Faculty Manual, the Administrative Professional Handbook, WAC 357-40 (civil service employees), or applicable collective bargaining agreements). For matters involving Title IX Sexual Harassment, the parties are provided with a live hearing, in which a decision maker will consider all relevant evidence. Witness statements made outside of the live hearing can only be considered by the decision maker if the witness submits to cross-examination by an advisor.

Back to top

Possible Sanctions

WSU vigorously enforces Executive Policy #15 (EP 15), the Policy Prohibiting Discrimination and Harassment. Persons determined to have violated this policy are subject to sanctions imposed using the procedures set forth in applicable university policies and handbooks (e.g., the WSU Faculty Manual, the Administrative Professional Handbook, BPPM 60.50, WAC 357-40 (civil service employees), applicable collective bargaining agreements, or WAC 504-26 containing the WSU Standards of Conduct for Students including any appeal procedures therein). Any imposed sanctions are to be adequately and appropriately severe to prevent future offenses and to protect other students and the University community. The sanctions that are imposed, or other actions taken, must be reported to CCR by the administrator or supervisor who imposed the sanctions.

In a matter involving an employee, possible sanctions may include: (i) verbal counseling; (ii) warning, verbal and/or in writing; (iii) required training; (iv) memorandum of concern; (v) letter of reprimand; (vi) suspension without pay; (vii) demotion; (viii) termination; or (ix) any combination of the previously stated disciplinary sanctions. In addition, inappropriate and unprofessional behavior by WSU personnel that does not rise to the level of a policy violation (e.g., unwelcome sexual comments that are not sufficiently severe or pervasive, and objectively offensive to constitute sexual harassment) may nonetheless be subject to corrective or disciplinary action in some cases.

In a matter involving a student, possible sanctions may include: (i) warning, verbal and/or in writing; (ii) probation; (iii) restitution; (iv) education or training; (v) community services; (vi) loss of student privilege loss of recognition; (viii) hold on transcript and/or registration; (ix) no contact order; (x) trespass from WSU campus; (xi) suspension from residence hall; (xii) removal from residence hall; (xiii) withholding degree; (xiv) revocation of admission and/or degree; (xv) university suspension; (xvi) university expulsion or (xvii) any combination of the previously stated disciplinary sanctions. More information on the student disciplinary process is included in the next section.

Back to top

Education, Training and Prevention Programs

WSU provides a range of education and prevention programs to strengthen prevention efforts, further develop campus-wide understanding of policy and processes, and enhance accessibility to services for victim/survivors of such violence. WSU regularly provides all students with information about reporting options via email messages, as well as through in-person trainings specifically designed to explain available processes. WSU also produces an array of online and printed materials for students and employees about accessing support services and making complaints regarding sexual violence, including sexual assault, sexual exploitation, dating violence, domestic violence, and stalking.

Back to top

Campus Security Programs

The Washington State University Vancouver Police Department (WSU Vancouver PD) strives to educate the campus community and maintain a reasonably safe environment on campus. WSU Vancouver PD personnel provides educational and prevention driven programs to students. Although WSU Vancouver PD takes many steps to educate and maintain safety on campus, each individual within the campus community plays a role and it is important to be aware of surroundings and use reasonable judgment when working or visiting on campus. Please report suspicious or criminal activities to law enforcement by calling 911.

Back to top

Prevention Programs

WSU Vancouver provides a wide range of crime prevention programming, as well as programming specific to preventing dating violence, domestic violence, sexual assault, and stalking.

Available Education for Incoming Students

Every incoming undergraduate student has access to education programs on the WSU Vancouver campus, about bystander intervention, risk reduction, and the definitions and WSU policies in place to respond to sexual assault, sexual exploitation, intimate partner violence and stalking.

  • SAFETY ON CAMPUS:
    • Is offered during the New Student Orientation, upon request for campus groups, and includes information about campus policies, resources and reporting options for students. In this workshop, students learn about WSU’s prohibition on dating violence, domestic violence, sexual assault, and stalking. They also learn the following definitions:
      • Dating violence: Intimate partner abuse is conduct or threats which are targeted against a person with whom an individual is in or had been in a romantic, sexual, or dating relationship, where the conduct or threats are used to coerce, intimidate, or control the person. This may include physical, verbal, emotional, psychological, or financial assault and/or control. It may also include direct or indirect conduct, as well as threats or conduct directed towards the person’s family, friends, property, or pets.
      • Domestic violence: A felony or misdemeanor crime of violence committed
        • By a current or former spouse or intimate partner of the victim
        • By a person with whom the victim shares a child in common
        • By a person who is cohabitating with, or has cohabitated with, the victim as a spouse or intimate partner
        • By a person similarly situated to a spouse of the victim under the domestic or family violence laws of the jurisdiction in which the crime of violence occurred, or
        • By any other person against an adult or youth victim who is protected from that person’s acts under the domestic or family violence laws of the jurisdiction in which the crime of violence occurred.
      • Sexual assault: Nonconsensual sexual contact is any intentional sexual touching, however slight, with any object or body part, by one person against another person's intimate parts (or clothing covering any of those areas), or by causing another person to touch his or her own or another person's intimate body parts without consent and/or by force. Sexual contact also can include any intentional bodily contact in a sexual manner with another person's non-intimate body parts. It also includes nonconsensual sexual intercourse.
      • Consent: Consent to any sexual activity must be clear, knowing, and voluntary. Anything less is equivalent to a "no." Clear, knowing, and voluntary consent to sexual activity requires that, at the time of the act, and throughout the sexual contact, all parties actively express words or conduct that a reasonable person would conclude demonstrates clear permission regarding willingness to engage in sexual activity and the conditions of such activity. Consent is active; silence or passivity is not consent. Even if words or conduct alone seem to imply consent, sexual activity is nonconsensual when:
        • Force or coercion is threatened or used to procure compliance with the sexual activity.
          • Force is the use of physical violence, physical force, threat, or intimidation to overcome resistance or gain consent to sexual activity.
          • Coercion is unreasonable pressure for sexual activity. When an individual makes it clear through words or actions that the individual does not want to engage in sexual contact, wants to stop, or does not want to go past a certain point of sexual interaction, continued pressure beyond that point may be coercive. Other examples of coercion may include using blackmail or extortion to overcome resistance or gain consent to sexual activity.
        • The person is asleep, unconscious, or physically unable to communicate his or her unwillingness to engage in sexual activity; or
        • A reasonable person would or should know that the other person lacks the mental capacity at the time of the sexual activity to be able to understand the nature or consequences of the act, whether that incapacity is produced by illness, defect, the influence of alcohol or another substance, or some other cause. When alcohol or drugs are involved, a person is considered incapacitated or unable to give valid consent if the individual cannot fully understand the details of the sexual interaction (i.e., who, what, when, where, why, and how), and/or the individual lacks the capacity to reasonably understand the situation and to make rational, reasonable decisions.
      • Stalking: Stalking is engaging in a course of conduct directed at a specific person that would cause a reasonable person to:

(a) Fear for his or her safety or the safety of others;

(b) Fear for harm to his or her property or the property of others; or

(c) Suffer substantial emotional distress.

Stalking includes, but is not limited to, conduct occurring in person, electronically, or through a third party.

  • Bystander Intervention:
    • Students can attend OSI seminars on bystander intervention to learn how to recognize and respond to situations that could be high risk for violence.
  • E-CHUG:
    • This online, confidential survey allows students to receive personalized feedback about the impacts of alcohol and other drug use. It is an open access survey, and available to all students.

Other programs designed to enhance understanding about sexual assault, sexual exploitation, intimate partner violence, and stalking are provided throughout the academic year. These interactive programs are open to all students on the WSU Vancouver campus. Students can sign up for programs through CougSync.

Campus Disciplinary Processes

The Center for Community Standards offers trainings to students and staff on the campus disciplinary programs throughout the year. Staff presentations are given per request. Peer Educators, student staff members employed by the Center for Community Standards, offer between five and ten information sessions weekly during the academic year to students who are engaged in the community standards process. These sessions outline what students can expect when engaging with the Center for Community Standards and also outline student rights and available resources.

Ally Training

The Gender Identity/Expression and Sexual Orientation Resource Center (GIESORC) is respectful of confidentiality and is knowledgeable about resources for members of the lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer community. WSU promotes an atmosphere that is safe, inclusive, and affirming for all members of the campus community and does not condone discrimination. Any faculty, staff, student, or community member may participate in Ally training. Starting summer 2020, Ally training will be expanded and offered monthly and on demand for departments and student organizations.

Discrimination, Sexual Harassment, and Sexual Violence Prevention Training

WSU Compliance and Civil Rights (CCR) offers a number of trainings for students, faculty, and staff in person, via video-conferencing software, and via on-demand webinars, including trainings on the WSU Policy Prohibiting Discrimination and Harassment; discrimination, sexual harassment, and sexual violence prevention; university investigative processes; grievance and disciplinary processes; available university resources and response; and targeted training on resources and reporting options for victims of dating violence, domestic violence, sexual assault, and stalking.

Cultural Competency Training

The Office of Outreach and Education formerly the Office of Equity and Diversity, offers a variety of workshops related to equity and inclusion that provide a link between theory and practical application of concepts related to engaging across difference. These workshops help participants build skills through experiential opportunities that are conducive to an inclusive and engaged campus climate and work environment. Faculty, staff, and administrators may register for Equity Education sessions (currently, the Equity 101 Workshop) via HRS Skillsoft or contact the Office of Outreach and Education to schedule additional workshops at 509-335-5078. In addition, student Peer-to-Peer training is available for student groups presented by the WSU Social Justice Peer Educator Project. To learn more about all training and workshops offered through the Office of Outreach and Education.

Bystander Intervention

WSU understands that keeping our community safe requires everyone on campus to be proactive. Often when bystanders see situations that could lead to violence, our tendency is to walk away. We may feel unsure about our role in the situation or may be concerned for our physical safety. Even so, there are safe and positive options available to intervene in situations that may lead to acts of violence. These options include:

  • Being direct. If you see someone doing something that is making another person uncomfortable, speak up.
  • Getting someone else involved. If you feel like you can’t handle the situation on your own, ask a group of friends to help you, or talk to a supervisor, Resident Advisor, or other person of authority. If the situation is making you feel unsafe, contact the police.
  • Creating a distraction. Sometimes the best way to get someone out of a potentially dangerous situation is to divert attention elsewhere.
  • If a situation is making you uncomfortable, chances are other people are uncomfortable too. By standing up and being a proactive bystander, you give other people encouragement to do the same.
  • Being proactive. There are small and simple actions that Cougs can take every day to create a safe and supportive campus. For more information about your role as a bystander, consider attending a bystander intervention training through Cougar Health Services.

Risk Reduction

WSU believes that it is not a victim/survivor’s decisions that lead to acts of harm or violence. Rather, someone else is making choices to cause harm to another person. Reducing rates of violence on our campus can seem overwhelming, but it becomes a much easier task when we all work together. There are steps everyone can take to promote individual and community safety on campus:

  • Plan ahead. Charge your phone before going out and stay in contact with your friends throughout the evening. Ask friends to check in with each other before leaving for the night. If someone doesn’t check in, call or text to make sure they’re okay.
  • Make a back-up plan if things don’t go as planned. Bring extra cash if you need to call a cab to get home or call a trusted friend to walk you home if you feel unsafe walking alone at night.
  • Pay attention to your gut instincts. If a situation feels uncomfortable, find someone you trust, or leave. Contact the police if you have concerns for your safety.
  • If choosing to drink alcohol, be aware of how your body responds to drinking and plan accordingly. Plan out how many drinks you’ll have and stick to that plan. Eat a full meal before going out or eat snacks throughout the night. Alternate between alcoholic and non-alcoholic drinks or beverages.
  • Respect everyone’s personal boundaries in all situations, including those involving sex. Consent at WSU must be clear, knowing, and voluntary. If you’re not certain you’ve obtained consent, stop and check in with your partner.

Back to top

Timely Warnings and Emergency Notifications

The Clery Act requires that “institutions must issue a timely warning for any Clery Act crime that occurs within Clery geography that is: (i) reported to campus security authorities; and (ii) is considered by the institution to represent a serious or continuing threat to students and employees.”

According to the Clery Act, the timely warning must be issued in a timely manner and will withhold the names and personally identifying information about the victims as defined within Section 40002(a) (20) of the Violence Against Women Act of 1994.

The timely warning will aid in the prevention of similar crimes, which may include incidents where the WSU Vancouver Police Department (WSU Vancouver PD) has identified a pattern of risk. A timely warning with respect to crimes reported to a pastoral or professional counselor is not required by WSU.

A timely warning may be issued for a crime or incident as deemed necessary or appropriate by the WSU Vancouver-PD. Taking into account the safety of the community, WSU Vancouver-PD’s officer-in-charge, or the above level, will issue a timely warning or will notify Administration and Communications who will determine the content, issue a timely warning notification, and initiate the appropriate elements of the notification system. In instances where there is a significant emergency or dangerous situation involving an immediate threat to the health and safety of students or employees occurring on the campus, WSU Vancouver will follow its emergency notification procedures.

WSU Vancouver PD makes determinations as to when a timely warning may be issued, which may vary on a case-by-case basis. Some examples of matters requiring timely warnings include, but are not limited to:

  • Investigations of a series of car thefts in one particular area
  • Unsolved pattern of thefts.
  • A pattern of drug dealings or activities that puts students at risk

Back to top

Dissemination of a Timely Warning

WSU Vancouver PD uses the WSU VanCoug Alert system as the primary method of distributing notification of a timely warning; however, additional communications tools may also be used, including, WSU Vancouver Emergency Notification System, WSU Vancouver Campus FYI, a press release, and the WSU Vancouver campus indoor/outdoor warning system. All WSU Vancouver students, staff, and faculty can subscribe and update their information for the WSU Vancouver Emergency Notification System system by accessing their MyWSU account.

Back to top

Emergency Response, Notifications and Evacuation Procedures

In the event of a significant emergency or dangerous situation involving an immediate threat to the health and safety of students or employees occurring on the campus, the WSU Vancouver PD will determine and employ communication methods appropriate to the situation to notify the affected university community without delay. Confirmation of significant emergencies will require direct investigation by appropriate WSU Vancouver personnel.

For all campus law enforcement issues, the WSU Vancouver-PD will be primarily responsible for confirming a significant emergency or dangerous public safety situation on campus through victim, witness, or officer observations. Taking into account the safety of the community, WSU Vancouver-PD’s officer-in-charge, or the above level, will issue an emergency notification or will immediately notify Administration and Communications who will issue an emergency notification, and initiate the appropriate elements of the notification system unless the notification will, in the professional judgment of responsible authorities, compromise efforts to assist victims or to contain, respond to, or otherwise mitigate the emergency. Additional information about WSU’s policies and procedures in place to respond to emergencies is available from the WSU Pullman Office of Emergency Management.

Other non-law enforcement emergencies such as hazardous materials releases, utility failures, computer systems/telecommunications failures, hazardous weather, infectious disease or public hazards, etc., may affect the WSU Vancouver campus. Other departments at WSU Vancouver, including, but not limited to Environmental Health and Safety, Facilities Services, Information Technology, or the Student Wellness Center may also confirm a significant emergency. Confirming departments will report the non-law enforcement emergency to the WSU Vancouver PD and/or the University Emergency Management Coordinator, or their designee, who has the primary responsibility to prepare and issue non-law enforcement emergency notifications. Whether the emergency is a law enforcement or non-law enforcement issue, those authorized to issue emergency notifications will be responsible for determining the appropriate segment or segments of the campus community to notify. Incident circumstances may require only a floor, building, facility, area, etc. to be notified as compared to the entire campus. Examples of situations that could require immediate emergency notifications could include:

  • A dangerous assailant for aggravated assault, robbery, arson, rape, murder (even if a suspect is in custody), etc.
  • An occurring or impending natural disaster, or an occurring or impending man-made disaster

An emergency notification will include information that would enable members of the university community to take actions to protect themselves, including information about the type of incident, location and instructions on what actions to take, and other safety tips.

Back to top

Dissemination of an Emergency Notification

WSU Vancouver has a number of methods to provide warning and notification of emergency situations affecting the campus, including the Campus Outdoor Warning System and the WSU Alert system.

The Campus Indoor/Outdoor Warning System consists of public address units on the Vancouver campus that WSU Vancouver may sound in the event of an emergency that may threaten the safety of individuals moving about the WSU Vancouver campus. A tone warning will be followed by a voice announcement that provides information on what individuals should do as an emergency situation develops.

The Emergency Notification System (ENS) is a second method for distributing a notification of an emergency warning, which connects directly to students, faculty, and staff using voice and text messaging by telephone and email to provide warning of an emergency. It will include basic directions on what steps people should take in response. Receiving emergency warning on personal cell phones, land line phones, and email requires registration. Registration can be accomplished by accessing a MyWSU account. All WSU students, staff, and faculty can subscribe and update their information for the Emergency Notification System by accessing their MyWSU account.

In addition to these primary notification methods, the WSU Vancouver Marketing and Communications Department also operates a campus-wide alert email list server which allows email transmission of warnings and other messages to the campus population.

To address the recent disturbing trends of violence on campuses for K-12 and higher education, the WSU Vancouver security community has developed a number of prevention and protection measures for mitigating such threat.

This includes the ability of the WSU Vancouver PD and/or the Facilities and Operations Department to lock most WSU Vancouver exterior building doors from the outside through an automated system. Studies compiled by the FBI indicate the importance of active access control in buildings and the ability to lock down the campus entry doors and allow occupants to secure themselves within their surroundings. This function provides safety to the occupants of the building and allows for transit time for police to respond and address the incident.

The complete WSU Alert system allows the university to disseminate official information via email text messages, telephone, loudspeakers, WSU VanCoug Alert page, social media and other means to notify the campus population of emergencies or threatening situations.

For example, should an active shooter situation occur, individuals would be made aware of the incident through the Emergency Notification System. Individuals could then assess their response to the situation based on the location and resources available and then choose the best action to ensure their safety.

All WSU students, staff and faculty can subscribe and update their information, such as email, telephone numbers, etc., for notifications through the WSU Alert system by accessing their MyWSU account.

Back to top

Drills, Exercises and Training

WSU Vancouver holds an emergency communications system test once a semester. The test includes activation of the Emergency Notification System, Campus Indoor/Outdoor Warning System, and the WSU VanCoug Alert page. Other methods of emergency communication may also be activated during these tests. These tests may be previously scheduled and announced to the community or may be unannounced.

WSU Vancouver holds drills or exercises for campus emergency responders and emergency management personnel at least once each year and conducts follow-through activities designed for assessment and evaluation of existing emergency response plans, procedures, and capabilities. Whenever possible, emergency responders from local agencies participate in these exercises or drills with WSU Vancouver emergency responders. WSU Vancouver maintains a summary of its emergency response and evacuation procedures in conjunction with at least one drill or exercise each calendar year.

WSU Vancouver Public Safety isresponsible for maintaining records of each of these evacuation drills for seven years as required by the Clery Act. WSU Vancouver Public Safety maintains records of all drills and exercises established for campus emergency responders as well as for emergency communications systems tests. WSU Vancouver Public Safety annually publishes information on emergency response and evacuation procedures in conjunction with the test and maintains the records for seven years as required by the Clery Act. The records include, for each test, a description of the exercise, the date, the time, and whether it was announced or unannounced.

WSU Vancouver PD provides active shooter training, safety consultations, and can share information about online trainings and resources. Individuals interested in additional information should contact WSU Vancouver PD at 360-546-9001.

Back to top

Campus Security

Safety Considerations in The Maintenance of Campus Facilities

WSU devotes time from various campus resources including Facilities Services and Environmental Health and Safety to address the safety and security of the campus. The key distribution for academic buildings is controlled by the colleges and departments within the building. The buildings are opened in the mornings and secured in the evening by Public Safety and Facilities staff. WSU Vancouver PD officers patrol these areas regularly. WSU Vancouver PD provides several services designed to enhance the safety of all WSU Vancouver community members:

  • A yearly “Night Walk” to survey areas of the campus in need of enhanced lighting or shrub and tree trimming.
  • Regular monitoring of lighting levels on campus.
  • The availability of blue light emergency phones around campus.

Students Events and Organizations

Groups or individuals may use the university’s limited public forum areas for those activities protected by the first amendment to the Constitution of the United States, subject to the requirements set forth in 504-33 WAC. University groups or individuals are requested to provide notice of the intended use of the desired Vancouver Campus limited public forum area to the Vice Chancellor of Finance and Operations. Non-university groups and individuals must provide notice five business days prior to the intended use of the desired limited public forum area, in accordance with WAC 504-33-025.

Registered Student Organizations and enrolled WSU Vancouver students may contact the WSU Vancouver Office of Student Involvement for more information about campus events at:

WSU Vancouver Office of Student Involvement
Firstenburg Student Commons (VFSC)
360-546-9163
van.osi@wsu.edu

Blue Light Phones

Should you need immediate assistance in an emergency, you can look for a blue light. The blue light identifies the location of an emergency telephone. Simply press the emergency telephone button (no dialing is necessary) to be connected to the CRESA 911 Center. Describe your emergency to the dispatcher. Please take notice of the location of the blue light telephones as you move throughout the campus. You may never need to use one, but they are there for emergencies.

Elevator Telephones

Emergency elevator telephones are located in the elevators on the WSU Vancouver campus. Simply push the button marked “Emergency Phone” if you are stuck in an elevator and you will be connected to an operator. If you are stuck, remain calm and stay inside the elevator. Trained elevator service personnel and/or CCSO Fire Department personal are authorized to remove trapped occupants. No one else should attempt to release them or to force elevator doors open. The elevator telephone is for emergencies ONLY; please refrain from using the telephone unless it is an emergency.

Student Care Network

The Student Care Network is an online resource that includes a Student Care Reporting Form that allows individuals to share concerns about a student’s emotional or psychological well-being, physical health, or academic performance with university administrators who can help. Anyone can submit a Student Care report including students, faculty, staff, family members, and community members. Information submitted through the AWARE network will be reviewed by Student Services for appropriate follow up.

Student Care Team

The Student Care Team responds to reports about students who are exhibiting behavior of concern and/or have received a Student Care or other report of a concern for a student. The multi-disciplinary Student Care team intervenes with care and support to protect the safety and well-being of the involved student, as well as the WSU community, by working directly with the student, and /or connecting students with others with appropriate resources and services.

Campus Patrol

WSU Vancouver-PD takes many steps to educate and maintain safety on campus, each individual within the campus community plays a role and it is important to be aware of surroundings and use reasonable judgment when working or visiting on campus. Please report suspicious or criminal activities to law enforcement at by calling 911.

Crime Log and Blotter

The WSU Vancouver-PD produces a Crime Log and on-line “Blotter” of all crimes reported to WSU Vancouver PD. The log is available to anyone wishing to access it. The log identifies the type of report, location, and outcome of each incident reported to the WSU Vancouver PD. The Daily Crime Log is available in person at WSU Vancouver PD, located at Police Office in the Classroom Building (VCLS 120). The Blotter is available on line at https://www.vancouver.wsu.edu/police-blotter.

Back to top

Drug and Alcohol Policies and Programs

WSU Policies Governing Alcohol and Other Drugs

WSU Executive Policy #20 aims to eliminate alcohol and drug abuse and to educate the University community on relevant laws and consequences. This policy provides consistency and clarity on the permitted use and enforcement of alcohol laws and statutes on all WSU properties statewide. WSU’s policy prohibits the unlawful possession, use, or distribution of illicit drugs or alcohol on University-controlled property.

Additionally, Washington state law, RCW Chapter 70.160, prohibits smoking in any WSU owned, leased, rented public place or place of employment. The WSU Pullman, WSU Spokane, WSU Tri-Cities, and WSU Vancouver campuses each restrict tobacco and nicotine use on campus, with the exception to tobacco cessation programs or approved research. Refer to Safety Policies and Procedures Manual (SPPM) 6.10.
Employees who violate Executive Policy #20 or SPPM 6.10 may be subject to corrective or disciplinary actions.

Workplace Policy

WSU complies with the Drug-Free Workplace Act of 1988. This program provides educational and training programs and prohibits the use of controlled substances in the workplace. In addition, WSU has developed programs to prevent the unlawful possession, use, and/or distribution of illegal drugs and alcohol by employees and students. Any employee who violates the WSU Alcohol and Drug Policy, Executive Policy #20, may be subject to corrective action by the university, in addition to any penalties resulting from violating local, state and/or federal law. Sanctions for illegal use of drugs and/or alcohol in the workplace may include, but are not limited to, recommendations for completion of an appropriate rehabilitation program, written or verbal warning, censure, dismissal, and, in emergency situations, immediate suspension. Additionally, Washington state law (RCW Chapter 70.160) prohibits smoking in any University owned, leased, or rented public place or place of employment.

Student Policy

The WSU Vancouver PD and local police enforce all Washington state laws pertaining to drugs and alcohol, and students may also be subject to sanctions through the Center for Community Standards (CCS). CCS will follow procedures outlined in the Standards of Conduct for Students (Standards of Conduct), WAC 504-26, if an alleged violation is reported.

The legal age for individuals to consume alcohol in the state of Washington is 21. Those not of legal age who consume alcohol will be in violation of the Standards of Conduct and WSU’s Alcohol and Drug Policy. Students of legal age who choose to drink alcoholic beverages are expected to do so responsibly and according to the policies and regulations of their living environment (i.e., residence halls, fraternity and sorority chapter-owned facilities, campus apartments, etc.).

Students may not:

  • Distribute and/or sell alcohol to anyone under the age of 21.
  • Drink or possess alcohol if under the age of 21.
  • Drink or possess alcohol regardless of age if alcohol is prohibited at the location.
  • Possess, use, manufacture, distribute and/or sell drugs (marijuana, narcotics, or other controlled substance) and drug paraphernalia (pipes, bongs, scales, cigarette papers, etc.).
  • Drink alcohol at a sponsored event on any University property without an alcohol license or banquet permit.
  • Overconsume alcohol or be intoxicated in public.

If students are under the age of 21 or are in a location that prohibits all alcohol or drugs (including residence hall rooms, shared areas in residence halls, fraternity and sorority chapter-owned facilities that are alcohol-free), leave the area immediately. Any person who is in the room while alcohol and/or drugs are present may be in violation of the Standards of Conduct and/or the law. Even if you just walked in the room, the alcohol and/or drugs isn’t yours, you did not drink any alcohol or use any drugs and/or you are completely sober, you may still be responsible for violating University Policy.
Students must comply with “no alcohol” policies if established for floors within residence halls, living groups, and/or designated residence halls.

Students are accountable to the Standards of Conduct from the time of application for admission through the actual awarding of a degree. The Standards of Conduct apply to on campus and online behavior and some off-campus behavior. For more information about jurisdiction, please visit WAC 504-26-015.

Medical and Recreational Cannabis

In accordance with the federal Drug-Free Schools and Communities Act Amendments of 1989, WSU strictly prohibits the use, possession, manufacture, or distribution and/or sale of cannabis and other controlled substances anywhere on campus. It is a violation of the Standards of Conduct, as well as University Housing Policy, for students to use, possess, manufacture, distribute and/or sell cannabis while on University property, even if the student is over the age of 21 and/or procured the cannabis through legal means.

Additionally, WSU prohibits the use of medical cannabis on campus, including all residence halls and WSU apartments. Cannabis obtained for medicinal purposes cannot be stored or used in the residence halls or WSU apartments. The use and/or storage of all drug paraphernalia is also prohibited in the residence halls and WSU apartments. All questions regarding the reasonable accommodation of medical conditions, including conditions treated with medical cannabis, should be directed to the WSU Access Center by calling 360-546-9238.

Back to top

Drug and Alcohol Education Programs

WSU Vancouver Counseling Services

WSU Vancouver Counseling Services offers a range of online and in-person services related to substance use. Services for currently enrolled students include; 1:1 counseling, therapy groups, crisis and consultation services, psychological assessments, workshops and outreach programs. These services support personal efforts to maintain health and the reduction of health harms—including substance use/disorder—so students can achieve academic, career, and personal success.

E-CHUG

e-CHUG is an online and confidential survey that allows students to receive personalized feedback about the impacts of alcohol and other drug use. It is an open access survey available to all students.

IMPACT

IMPACT is an education service provided to students, who are referred by the Center for Community Standards (CCS) for substance use violations. The purpose of this intervention is to administer a substance abuse education program that is focused on harm reduction strategies, motivational interviewing, and brief intervention. The IMPACT classes and 1:1 sessions have been developed to provide an empirically-based intervention to meet the specific needs of students who exhibit high risk substance use behaviors. The IMPACT program is unique in that it is not a ‘one size fits all’ intervention; rather, IMPACT is structured to route students, via confidential assessment with personalized feedback, to the intervention that best meets their needs in terms of behavior change, psycho-education, and clinical concerns.

Students receive direction for their routed participation (group or 1:1 sessions and assessment type) in multiple ways: from the Center for Community Standards (CCS), in the IMPACT workshop, and the Health Promotions website. A detailed procedural flow chart and routing logic for 1:1 vs. group the 4 sanction types (alcohol, cannabis, poly-substance, and other drug) as well as the sanction/violation number (1, 2, 3) is available upon request.

WSU Vancouver Health Services

WSU Vancouver Health Services partners with The Vancouver Clinic to provide basic health care, including consultation for services related to substance abuse, to current WSU Vancouver Students.

Back to top

Additional Campus Security Policies or Resources

Missing Student Policy

WSU Vancouver takes the well-being of students seriously and the university has processes in place when a student is missing. If anyone has reason to believe that a WSU Vancouver student is missing, they should immediately call 911 and report the concern to the local police department. After reporting the person missing WSU Vancouver PD should be notified of the missing person and which department is the investigating police agency. WSU Vancouver PD will assist the investigating agency when needed.

Procedures

WSU Vancouver does not currently have on campus housing. As such WSU Vancouver-PD will not be the originating police agency taking a report of a missing student. WSU Vancouver-PD will participate in any Law Enforcement requests for assistance concerning a WSU missing student.

Weapons Policy

The WSU Standards of Conduct for Students, WAC 504-26-213, prohibits students from carrying, possessing or using any firearm, explosive (including fireworks), dangerous chemicals, or any dangerous weapon on university property or in university approved housing. Additionally, airsoft guns and any other item that appears to be a firearm, or any item that shoots projectiles are prohibited in WSU housing.

Back to top

Sexual or Violent Offenders List

The Campus Sex Crimes Prevention Act of 2000 requires colleges and universities to inform students and employees how to learn the identity of registered sex offenders on campus. This law also requires that sex offenders provide notice to any institution of higher education at which the person is employed or is a student.

You can obtain information regarding registered sexual offenders by contacting the Clark County Sheriff’s Office, 360-397-2211 or sheriff@clark.wa.gov. Additionally, the Clark County Sheriff’s Office uses the Community Watch portal which can be found at the http://communitynotification.com/. This page includes information on how to search for registered sex offenders in the area as well as additional information about sex offender registration laws and safety tips.

Back to top

Crime Definitions under Federal Law

The following definitions are provided in the Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Policy and Campus Crime Statistics Act (Clery Act), or referenced from the Federal Bureau of Investigation’s (FBI) Uniform Crime Reporting (UCR) Program. For purposes of complying with the Clery Act, an incident meeting these definitions is considered a crime for the purpose of Clery Act reporting.

Dating violence:

Violence committed by a person who is or has been in a social relationship of a romantic or intimate nature with the victim.

(i) The existence of such a relationship shall be determined based on the reporting party's statement and with consideration of the length of the relationship, the type of relationship, and the frequency of interaction between the persons involved in the relationship.

(ii) For the purposes of this definition -

(A) Dating violence includes, but is not limited to, sexual or physical abuse or the threat of such abuse.

(B) Dating violence does not include acts covered under the definition of domestic violence.

(iii) For the purposes of complying with the requirements of this section and § 668.41, any incident meeting this definition is considered a crime for the purposes of Clery Act reporting.

Domestic violence:

(i) A felony or misdemeanor crime of violence committed -

(A) By a current or former spouse or intimate partner of the victim;

(B) By a person with whom the victim shares a child in common;

(C) By a person who is cohabitating with, or has cohabitated with, the victim as a spouse or intimate partner;

(D) By a person similarly situated to a spouse of the victim under the domestic or family violence laws of the jurisdiction in which the crime of violence occurred, or

(E) By any other person against an adult or youth victim who is protected from that person's acts under the domestic or family violence laws of the jurisdiction in which the crime of violence occurred.

Sexual assault:

An offense that meets the definition of rape, fondling, incest, or statutory rape as used in the FBI's UCR program.

Rape: The penetration, no matter how slight, of the vagina or anus with any body part or object, or oral penetration by a sex organ of another person, without the consent of the victim.

Fondling:

The touching of the private body parts of another person for the purpose of sexual gratification, without the consent of the victim, including instances where the victim is incapable of giving consent because of their age or because of their temporary or permanent mental or physical incapacity.

Incest:

Sexual intercourse between persons who are related to each other within the degrees wherein marriage is prohibited by law.

Statutory Rape:

Sexual intercourse with a person who is under the statutory age of consent.

Stalking:

(i) Engaging in a course of conduct directed at a specific person that would cause a reasonable person to -

(A) Fear for the person's safety or the safety of others; or

(B) Suffer substantial emotional distress.

(ii) For the purposes of this definition -

(A) Course of conduct means two or more acts, including, but not limited to, acts in which the stalker directly, indirectly, or through third parties, by any action, method, device, or means, follows, monitors, observes, surveils, threatens, or communicates to or about a person, or interferes with a person's property.

(B) Reasonable person means a reasonable person under similar circumstances and with similar identities to the victim.

(C) Substantial emotional distress means significant mental suffering or anguish that may, but does not necessarily, require medical or other professional treatment or counseling.

Murder and nonnegligent manslaughter:

The willful (non-negligent) killing of one human being by another. Any death caused by injuries received in a fight, argument, quarrel, assault, or commission of a crime is classified as murder and non-negligent manslaughter.

Negligent manslaughter:

The killing of another person through gross negligence. Deaths of persons due to their own negligence, accidental deaths not resulting from gross negligence, and traffic fatalities, are not included in the category Manslaughter by Negligence.

Robbery:

The taking, or attempted taking, of anything of value from one person by another, in which the offender uses force or the threat of violence.

Aggravated Assault:

Aggravated assault is an unlawful attack by one person upon another for the purpose of inflicting severe or aggravated bodily injury. This type of assault usually is accompanied by the use of a weapon or by means likely to produce death or great bodily harm.

Burglary:

The unlawful entry into a building or other structure with the intent to commit a felony or a theft.

Motor Vehicle theft:

The theft or attempted theft of a motor vehicle, including automobiles, trucks, motorcycles, and mopeds.

Arson:

The willful or malicious burning or attempt to burn, with or without intent to defraud, a dwelling house, public building, motor vehicle, or aircraft, personal property of another, etc.

Liquor Law Violations:

The violation of laws or ordinance prohibiting: the manufacture, safe, transporting, furnishing, possessing of intoxicating liquor; maintaining unlawful drinking places; bootlegging; operating a still; furnishing liquor to a minor or intemperate person; underage possession; using a vehicle for illegal transportation of liquor; drinking on a train or public conveyance; and all attempts to commit any of the aforementioned offenses.

Drug Law Violations:

Violations of State and local laws relating to the unlawful possession, sale, use, growing, manufacturing, and making of narcotic drugs. The relevant substances include opium or cocaine and their derivatives (morphine, heroin, codeine); marijuana; synthetic narcotics (Demerol, methadone); and dangerous non-narcotic drugs (barbiturates, Benzedrine).

Hate crime:

A crime reported to local police agencies or to a campus security authority that manifests evidence that the victim was intentionally selected because of the perpetrator's bias against the victim. For the purposes of this section, the categories of bias include the victim's actual or perceived race, religion, gender, gender identity, sexual orientation, ethnicity, national origin, and disability.

For Clery Act reporting purposes, hate crimes include any offense in the following list that is motivated by bias: Murder and non-negligent manslaughter, sex offense, robbery, aggravated assault, burglary, motor vehicle theft, arson, destruction/damage/vandalism to property, intimidation, larceny/theft, and simply assault.

Back to top

Crime Definitions under Washington State Law

The following definitions are provided under Washington State Law, RCW 9A.44.010.

Consent

At the time of the act of sexual intercourse or sexual contact there are actual words or conduct indicating freely given agreement to have sexual intercourse or sexual contact.

Mental Incapacity

A condition existing at the time of the offense which prevents a person from understanding the nature or consequences of the act of sexual intercourse whether that condition is produced by illness, defect, the influence of a substance, or from some other cause.

Physically Helpless

A person who is unconscious or for any other reason is physically unable to communicate unwillingness to an act.

Forcible Compulsion

Physical force which overcomes resistance, or a threat, express or implied, that places a person in fear of death or physical injury to herself or himself or another person, or in fear that she or he or another person will be kidnapped.

Sexual Intercourse

  • Has its ordinary meaning and occurs upon any penetration, however slight, and
  • Also means any penetration of the vagina or anus however slight, by an object, when committed on one person by another, whether such persons are of the same or opposite sex, except when such penetration is accomplished for medically recognized treatment or diagnostic purposes, and
  • Also means any act of sexual contact between persons involving the sex organs of one person and the mouth or anus of another whether such persons are of the same or opposite sex

Sexual Contact

Any touching of the sexual or other intimate parts of a person done for the purpose of gratifying sexual desire of either party or a third party.

Domestic Violence (RCW 26.50.010)

  • Physical harm, bodily injury, assault, or the infliction of fear of imminent physical harm, bodily injury or assault, sexual assault, or stalking as defined in RCW 9A.46.110 of one intimate partner by another intimate partner; or
  • Physical harm, bodily injury, assault, or the infliction of fear of imminent physical harm, bodily injury or assault, sexual assault, or stalking as defined in RCW 9A.46.110 of one family or household member by another family or household member.

Family or Household Members (RCW 26.50.010)

  • Adult persons related by blood or marriage;
  • Adult persons who are presently residing together or who have resided together int he past; and
  • Persons who have a biological or legal parent-child relationship, including stepparents and stepchildren and grandparents and grandchildren.

Intimate Partner (RCW 26.50.010)

  • Spouses, or domestic partners;
  • Former spouses, or former domestic partners;
  • Persons who have a child in common regardless of whether they have been married or have lived together at any time;
  • Adult persons presently or previously residing together who have or have had a dating relationship;
  • Persons sixteen years of age or older who are presently residing together or who have resided together in the past and who have or have had a dating relationship; and
  • Persons sixteen years of age or older with whom a person sixteen years of age or older has or has had a dating relationship.

Dating Relationship

A social relationship of a romantic nature. Factors that the court may consider in making this determination include:

  • The length of time the relationship has existed;
  • The nature of the relationship; and
  • The frequency of interaction between the parties

Back to top

Crime Statistics

Preparation of Crime Statistics

The Washington State University Vancouver Department of Public Safety, in accordance with the Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Policy and Campus Crime Statistics Act (The Clery Act) as well as the Violence Against Women Reauthorization Act of 2013 (VAWA) amendments to the Clery Act, using information obtained by through the representatives from various WSU Vancouver offices including, but not limited to, the WSU Vancouver Police Department (WSU Vancouver PD), the Compliance and Civil Rights (CCR), the Center for Community Standards (CCS), and the Office of Emergency Management.

The crime statistics include reports of, arrests for, and disciplinary actions arising from selected crimes. Effective with the 1999 calendar year, the Clery Act requires an expanded reporting that includes crimes and arrests occurring in certain off-campus locations. This page is part of Washington State University (WSU) Vancouver’s annual report, which we encourage you to read in full. Other sections of the report include institutional policies concerning campus security, such as policies concerning crime prevention and the reporting of crimes, together with important information concerning WSU Vancouver's policies regarding alcohol and drug use, and Washington State University’s sexual assault prevention programs.

The Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Policy and Campus Crime Statistics Act (The Clery Act), 20 U.S.C. 1092(f), requires the annual publication of crime statistics for the previous three calendar years.

Collection of Statistics

The Office of Student Services and the WSU Vancouver Department of Public Safety coordinate the preparation of the annual report, including the gathering of crime statistics. The annual crime statistics are compiled from data provided by: the WSU Vancouver Department of Public Safety, the Clark County Sheriff's Office, and Campus Security Authorities (University officials who have significant responsibility for student and campus activities). WSU Vancouver has no off-campus facilities and no resident facilities; therefore, no statistics from those categories are recorded. If you have questions regarding the statistics published here, please contact the WSU Vancouver Department of Public Safety.

Crime Definitions: The crime definitions used to collate the statistics in this report conform to the requirements of the implementing regulations of the Clery Act (ref. 34 CFR 668.46(c)(7)).

Crime Statistics table

Crime statistics for 2017, 2018 and 2019.
Reported incidents on or near college facilities
2017 2018 2019
ONC
(1)
OCC
(2)
NON
(3)
ONC
(1)
OCC
(2)
NON
(3)
ONC
(1)
OCC
(2)
NON
(3)
Part I - Reported
Criminal Homicide
Murder or Non-negligent manslaughter 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Negligent Manslaughter 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Sexual Assault and Sex Offenses
Rape 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0
Fondling 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Incest 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Statutory Rape 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Part I - Continued
Robbery 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Aggravated Assault 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Burglary 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Motor Vehicle Theft 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0
Arson 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Hate crimes by category
(Hate Crimes are defined and listed under the Timely Warnings section of this report)
Larceny-theft 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Simple Assault 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Intimidation 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Desctruction, damage, vandalism of property 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
VAWA Offenses
Domestic Violence 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Dating Violence 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Stalking 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Part one crime totals 1 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0
Unfounded/Withheld Reports 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0
Part II - Reported
Liquor Law Violation 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Drug Abuse Law Violation 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Illegal Weapons Violation 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Part two crime totals 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Number of arrests and campus discipline referrals
Arrests
18 Yrs. and Over 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
17 Yrs. and Under 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Arrests or referrals for campus disciplinary action for:
Alcohol Abuse Violations(c)
Arrests 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Referrals 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Drug Abuse Violations (c)
Arrests 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Referrals 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Weapons Possessions and Violations (c)
Arrests 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Referrals 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Table notes

(1) ONC: On Campus: This category includes incidents that occurred on the main campus.

(2) OCC: Off-campus contiguous. This category includes incidents that occurred on public property immediately adjacent to and accessible from the campus. The information in this category is provided by the Clark County Sheriff's Department. For additional information on crime statistics in Clark County, please contact the Clark County Sheriff’s Department at: (360) 397-2211.

(3) NON: Non-campus facilities. This category includes incidents that occurred on property other than the main campus owned or controlled by the university and used in support of our educational purposes. WSU has no Non-campus facilities at this time.

a) The F.B.I. defines forcible sex offenses as: rape and attempted rape, forcible sodomy, sexual assault with an object, and forcible fondling.

b) The F.B.I. defines non-forcible sex offenses as: incest and statutory rape.

c) The number of persons referred for disciplinary action does not include persons arrested and reported in the arrest categories above.

Effective from the 1999 calendar year, the Clery Act requires the reporting of crime statistics for an expanded area beyond WSU Vancouver’s campus. The law and accompanying regulations also require these statistics to be shown in specific geographic categories (or venues) as defined below.

Federal regulations define On Campus as any building or property owned or controlled by an institution within the same reasonably contiguous geographic area and used by the institution in direct support of, or in a manner related to, the institution’s educational purposes, including residence halls; and any building or property that is within or reasonably contiguous to the said area and is owned by the institution but controlled by another person, is frequently used by students, and supports institutional purposes (such as a food or other retail vendor) 34 CFR 668.46(a).

On campus - residential facilities only is a sub-category of On Campus showing the number of on-campus crimes that took place in dormitories or other residential facilities for students on campus 34 CFR 668.46(c)(4)(ii). NOTE: WSU Vancouver does not have residential facilities or a residential population.

On adjacent public property is defined as all public property, including thoroughfares, streets, sidewalks, and parking facilities, that are within the campus, or immediately adjacent to and accessible from the campus 34 CFR 668.46(a).

In or on a non-campus building or property is defined as any building or property owned or controlled by a student organization that is officially recognized by the institution and any building or property owned or controlled by an institution that is used in direct support of, or in relation to, the institution’s educational purposes, is frequently used by students, and is not within the same reasonably contiguous geographic area of the institution 34 CFR 668.46(a). NOTE: WSU Vancouver has no property meeting this definition.

Hate Crimes: The Clery Act requires the separate reporting, by category of prejudice, of any crime reported in the classifications above and any other crime involving larceny-theft, simple assault, intimidation, and destruction, damage or vandalism of property that manifests evidence that the victim was intentionally selected because of the victim’s actual or perceived race, gender, religion, sexual orientation, ethnicity, national origin or disability.

The University does not record statistics for crimes involving students or student organizations that occur in other law enforcement jurisdictions as part of the Uniform Crime Report. However, the Washington State University Vancouver Department of Public Safety does maintain good communication with local law enforcement and tries to monitor incidents involving students that do occur in other jurisdictions.

Back to top